Exploring the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival in Cary

Last Updated on January 10, 2022

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The North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival in Cary is an awesome event that’s one of the most unique things to do during winter in North Carolina. This bucket list-worthy festival brings in spectators and day-trippers from across the state and throughout the southern United States.

Ticket Info

To prepare for the festival, 25 Chinese artisans from Chicago-based Tianyu Arts & Culture hand-assemble each beautiful lantern. They stay in Cary during the festival to produce and perform the traditional Chinese acrobatic performances, too.

Since we’ve visited multiple times, we’re going to share some helpful tips and info so you can be prepared for your trip out to the Koka Booth Amphitheatre for the Chinese Lantern Festival this year and beyond.

Here’s how we’ve organized this guide for you:

  • About the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival
  • Dates
  • Detailed Ticket Info
  • Before You Go: Things to Know (Parking, Food, and Clear Bag Policy)

You can skip ahead to any of these specific sections or continue reading about the history of the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival.

Read More: November and December in North Carolina

What is the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival? (History and Today)

Chinese lanterns go back thousands of years and are thought to represent good fortune and prosperity. Since 2015, the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival has been bringing both to the Research Triangle in Central North Carolina.

Over 100,000 people flock to Cary each year to experience the beautiful LED lantern displays. Most of the lanterns at the festival are hand-made in China’s lantern capital—the city of Zigong, in Sichuan Province.

Cary NC Chinese Lantern Festival Image

We reached out to officials behind the festival and Booth Amphitheatre General Manager Taylor Traversari shared his thoughts, explaining, “the festival delights youngsters, it energizes older adults, and brings families together.”

Traversari added, “It also provides a glimpse into Chinese culture and adds to the beautiful tapestry of all that North Carolina has to offer.”

Read More: Kid-Friendly Events in North Carolina

When is the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival?

The Chinese Lantern Festival runs from November 19, 2021, through January 9, 2022.

Read More: January in North Carolina

Doors open at 6:00 pm so plan about an hour to walk the colorful lantern-filled half-mile loop. That gives you plenty of time to stop and take selfies and sip your boozy hot chocolate while you stroll around.

The Chinese Lantern Festival in Cary NC Performance Image

Performances happen at 6:30 pm, 7:30 pm, and 8:30 pm. The acrobats balance, jump, and perform as onlookers can stand huddled under heat lamps to watch in awe.

Detailed Ticket Info

Chinese Lantern Festival Cary NC Image

Children under 3 years old get in free and North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival tickets start at $11. The price depends on whether you order in advance or if you choose a flexible Any Night Ticket.

Any Night Tickets are $25 and allow you to choose the date you’d like to attend. This is great for those who are flexible and if weather impacts the day you plan to see the lanterns.

If you’re planning ahead and want to choose the date you and your loved ones will be attending the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival, date-specific tickets are available.

Chinese Lantern Festival Near Raleigh NC Image

This event takes place rain or shine. So if you’ve bought a ticket for a specific date and it’s raining, pack your umbrella or a raincoat.

Note: Online ticket purchases will help you skip the lines that inevitably form on busy nights. If you’d like to purchase a ticket in advance and in person, the Box Office is open from 3:00 pm to 9:00 pm Tuesday to Friday and 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays.

Here’s a quick breakdown of North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival location, dates, and ticket prices:

  • When: November 19 to January 9, 2022, from 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm (closed on Mondays except December 23 and 30)
  • Where: Cary’s Koka Booth Amphitheatre (8003 Regency Parkway, Cary, NC 27518)
  • Ticket Prices
    • Ages 2 and Under: FREE
    • Any Night: ($25)
    • Date-Specific Tickets: Starting at $11
    • Twilight Ticket Experience: $15 to $25
    • VIP (Very Important Panda) Tours: $20 to $35
    • More Info Here
  • Contact: 800-514-3849 or visit boothamphitheatre.com

Before You Go: Things to Know

Parking

Parking is free so arrive at Booth Amphitheatre as early as possible, especially if you need to buy tickets before entering.

Clear Bag Policy

To create a safe experience for all guests and staff, the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival has upped its safety practices with a clear bag policy. You can still bring in a 4.5″ x 6.5″ small clutch or wallet, but otherwise, a clear bag is all that is allowed inside.

Sizes allowed are 1-gallon ziplock bags and 12″ x 12″ x 9″ bags.

Wait Times

The Lantern Fest in Cary NC Image

Lines to get in the festival can get long, especially on busy weekends, holidays, and clear warm North Carolina “winter” nights. Over 100,000 people flock to Booth Amphitheatre during this event, so things can get a little crowded.

If you purchase your ticket in advance, you can breeze through the lines and quickly get to the lanterns!

Seating Info (for Performances)

Cary Chinese Lantern Images

If you want to watch the Chinese Lantern Festival’s cultural performances, there is limited seating and outside chairs and mats are not allowed. That’s why we recommend finding a cozy spot and cuddling up with your loved ones!

There are plenty of heat lamps dispersed across the grounds in case it’s a chillier night.

Food and Drink

The concession stands are located at the top of the Crescent Deck. Special holiday treats will be sold at the festival.

On select nights, food trucks will be waiting to serve you something hot and delicious!

Accessibility Info

Koka Booth Amphitheatre is accessible and offers accessible parking located across from the Box Office and Main Gate. The walkways are paved and strollers and wheelchairs should have no problem navigating the festival.

Things to Do in Cary Beyond the Chinese Lantern Festival

Whether you’re traveling from far away or driving from somewhere nearby, here are a couple of our favorite things to do in Cary.

Read More: The Mayton Inn in Cary (+ 7 Things We Love About Staying Here!)

Bond Park

Bond Park Cary NC

The 310-acre Fred H Bond Metro Park has trails for walking, plenty of open space for picnics, and a beautiful lake. You can check out the boats at Bond Park and spend a day fishing and boating here, too.

There are also baseball fields, a playground, and ropes challenge course at Bond Park!

Read More: Things to Do in Raleigh

Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve

Things to Do in Cary NC Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve Image

If you’re in Cary before the sun goes down, we definitely recommend taking a stroll through the Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve. The 140-acres of wooded trails are dedicated to protecting a unique collection of Eastern Hemlock trees and wildlife.

Read More: Hiking near Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill

Bond Brothers Beer Company

Before or after the festival, head over to Bond Brothers Beer Company to enjoy a pint or, even better, a flight. They have 14 beers on tap and feature barrel sours, excellent stouts, and IPAs.

Read More: North Carolina Breweries

Ready for the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival?

We love the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival and hope to keep it a yearly tradition for our family. If you’ve visited this festival before, we’d love to know what you thought of this unique event.

If you’ve never attended the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival, please share more about your first time with us here in the comments or by email.

More Things to Do in Cary (and Raleigh)

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